The art of Kevin Blythe Sampson

THE ART OF
KEVIN BLYTHE SAMPSON

6/19/14

Gentrification fuels rift among Newark’s local artists | Al Jazeera America

Gentrification fuels rift among Newark’s local artists | Al Jazeera America
Longtime residents feel left out of resurgence as newcomers land prime art spaces
Gilbert Hsiao, 58, has bounced among various studios, from Berlin to the concrete shell of a defunct oil tank in Brooklyn before landing space in downtown Newark, New Jersey, where he now paints his colorful, geometric art pieces.
Once overlooked as an art destination and better known for its 1967 riots and urban decay, Newark’s downtown hosts a growing visual arts scene that has attracted outsiders like Hsiao with cheap rent, good public transportation and a constellation of cutting-edge galleries that have garnered outsize praise. There are more than a dozen art galleries in Newark in addition to spaces that double as coffee shops or beauty parlors.
But as these newcomers increasingly flock to Newark, some older artists — many of whom are black and are longtime residents — are feeling overlooked, especially as a few gallery owners and artists who are relatively recent arrivals have snagged prime real estate. Tension within the visual arts community is brewing as the downtown area is poised for gentrification. New, luxury apartments are for rent, upscale cafes and restaurants are coming soon, and a Whole Foods is slated to open in a few years.
“There a lot of whites coming into Newark now,” said Kevin Sampson, 59, a black artist known for his elaborate sculptures made of found objects. A resident since 1993 who has been involved in the city’s art scene longer than that, Sampson has led the debate on Newark’s older artists versus its newcomers, whom he describes as “carpetbaggers” and “white hipster refugees from Brooklyn.”
Sampson wants the new artists and gallery owners to pay their dues and respect the history of the artists who have been in the city for years or decades. He said a few galleries and artists have received space for free or at reduced rents and bluntly described it as white privilege.
“They use privilege to set something up,” he said. “They are getting free buildings. Its landowners say they trust you.”
Bisa Washington, a 63-year-old Newark resident and artist who has been involved in the art scene since the 1970s, agrees with Sampson.
“It was a question of access,” she said. “You look around, and you wonder how these things are happening, why the artists who are already here weren’t pulled into that loop.”
Sampson said he plans to hold a round table on the topic in the fall.
You look around, and you wonder how these things are happening, why the artists who are already here weren’t pulled into that loop.
Bisa Washington
Newark artist

newark artists gentrification

Kevin Sampson, 59, is an artist known for making elaborate sculptures out of found objects. He has lived in Newark for more than 20 years.
Sharon Adarlo

Rebecca Jampol is the owner and one of the founders of Solo(s) Project House, an art gallery in downtown Newark that rents its space. She’s also a founder of the Gateway Project, a series of pop-up exhibitions at the Gateway Center, a commercial complex adjacent to Newark Pennsylvania Station. C&K Properties, a real estate company, donated the space for the Gateway Project.
“My interactions with all the older artists who have been here a longer time have always been positive,” Jampol said. She added that she acknowledges the groundwork they’ve laid and is aware of the criticisms lobbed by Sampson and others.
“I am here the same reason they are here,” she said. “To indulge in a city that has a lot of inspiration.”
Evonne Davis, a founder of Gallery Aferro in downtown Newark, where Hsiao works, swatted away criticism that she, as a white woman, was favored for free space. The RBH Group, a major real estate developer in the city, donated space for the gallery after she and her partner, Emma Wilcox, had started another gallery, she said.
“We have already proven we got it done,” she said. “The idea we got the space for any other reason than hard work is, frankly, insulting.”
Davis said she and Wilcox work hard to pay the gallery’s hefty heat and electricity bills by selling work, fundraising and working other jobs. Davis said she does not get a salary running the gallery and works as a consultant, art handler and photographer.
“We are not above criticism. We are not perfect,” she said. “We try hard to be part of the solution, not part of problem.”
Gallery Aferro has shown many works by local artists, including well known Newark artist and performer Jerry Gant, who recently had a large solo show. The Gateway Center has shown Sampson’s work.
“This tension is long-standing,” said Clement Price, a history professor at Rutgers University. “There has always been an insider-outsider dynamic.”
Price says tension within the arts community was also revealed when the New Jersey Performing Arts Center opened in 1997. Critics, he said, believed “NJPAC was a larger plot to bring whites back into city.”
Redevelopment has accelerated in recent years, and Hsiao says Newark is an increasingly attractive option as people are pushed out of Manhattan, Brooklyn and Jersey City, which has a vibrant arts community and faces increasing gentrification too.
At least one longtime Newark artist applauds the changes.
“I feel really good about it,” said visual artist Gladys Grauer, who at the age of 90 is considered the godmother of the city’s art scene. “There are so many artists now.”
Grauer, a black artist, has watched the city evolve since she moved there in the early 1950s. In 1972 she opened the Aard Gallery, the first art gallery in the city since the Great Depression and the only local place for visual expression besides the Newark Museum, she said. It was in the city’s South Ward, where she currently resides.
The arts community grew as galleries like City Without Walls (1975) and Aljira (1983) were founded, both fixtures in the city. The nonprofit Newark Arts Council formed in 1981 and has promoted artists ever since with open studio events and other programs.
Grauer said the more recent arrivals over the past 15 years have established themselves in Newark rather than coming and going, as they did in the past.
“People started to think there was something great here,” she said. “[Artists] were looking to seek their fortune in New York. They are now seeking their fortune here, which I think is excellent. They want to stay here and work.”







5/18/14

The Roots of the Spirit: Lonnie Holley, Mr. Imagination, Charlie Lucas, Kevin Sampson will be on view at the Wiegand Gallery from September 15 to November 15, 2013

Select Upcoming African American Art Exhibitions: Highlights for 2013

This highlight features a few exhibitions that will be on view this coming year, 2013. Presenting the exhibitions as they approach their opening dates assures a freshness and currency of information for the visual art enthusiasts. A number of important traveling exhibitions from 2012 or earlier will still be on tour in 2013, and they are accessible from the sidebar of this Blog, Highlights of African American Exhibitions....  This sidebar is updated on a weekly basis by either adding newly discovered exhibitions or removing those that are approaching their expiration date. Its intent is to provide comprehensive coverage of current ongoing exhibitions on view for the current quarter of the year.

Black Art Project (BAP) welcomes any information or leads that you might have relating to Black art exhibitions, particularly regional exhibitions that are not traditionally marketed on a national scale. BAP will verify the accuracy of any information submitted. Thank you for any assistance that you provide.

Mr. Imagination, Ghost Dress - 2000
Wire mesh, mother of pearl buttons - 48 x 36 x 36 inches
Created in 2011 for "The Roots of the Spirit" exhibition at L'Espace Re-Evolution, Venice, Italy.

The Roots of the Spirit: Lonnie Holley, Mr. Imagination, Charlie Lucas, Kevin Sampson will be on view at the Wiegand Gallery from September 15 to November 15, 2013. This exhibition was originally on view at L'Éspace Re-Evolution (Venice, Italy) where these four artists were invited by the American Folk Art Museum to exhibit during the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011.
Each of these artists "has acknowledged that divine intervention played an essential role in showing them their path. With the conviction of their African legacy, they began making art that honored their ancestors as an antidote to death and private grief. To witness Kevin Sampson’s shrines to deceased friends and relatives; the ancestor thrones of Lonnie Holley and Mr. Imagination; and Charlie Lucas’ metal sculptures that honor his grandparents by their material and method, is seeing through the eyes of the artists’ ancestors. Art is their testament to memory, healing and ultimately spiritual renewal."

Read more about these artists and view their works at The Roots of the Spirit.http://blackartproject.blogspot.com/2012_11_01_archive.html

5/8/14

DETOUR:SELF-TAUGHT ARTISTS AT THE NOYES MUSEUM

The Noyes Museum of Art of The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
733 Lily Lake Rd, Oceanville, NJ
08231 • 609
-652-8848 •
www.noyesmuseum.org
PRESS RELEASE
FOR
IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:Nicole
Ellis, Visual Communications Manager
April29, 2014
publicrelations@noyesmuseum.org
(609) 652-8848 ext. 305
DETOUR:SELF-TAUGHT ARTISTS AT THE NOYES MUSEUM
Artists present their own personal universe and a pure
desire to create
OCEANVILLE (GALLOWAY TWP.), NJ
The Noyes Museum of Art of Stockton College presents
Detour
a group exhibition showcasing American self-taught artists
from the region
from
May 16
through
September 21, 2014.
An opening reception
is planned for
June 6,5:00-8:00pm.
For more information call
(609) 652-8848 or visit
www.noyesmuseum.org
.
Self-taughtart typically refers to artwork that is created by artists who do not have any formal training.It is direct, honest, and accessible to the viewer. It is art straight from the soul.
 
This unique exhibition has been
assembled from The Noyes Museum’s
permanent collection, as well as galleries and private collections.
There are a range of personal histories of the artists represented in the exhibition.
However,what they do have in common is that they are not trained in an academic fashion.
It is theidea that is of most importance.
Self-taught artists follow their own intuition—
their own need to create.It is their pure, organic, and sincere
approach to the work that imbues it with powerful resonance.
The work presented holds n
ational importance and local relevance.
 
Acclaimed artists including Malcah Zeldis,
Minnie Evans, Victor Gatto, and New Jersey artists A
lbert Hoffmann, Janice Fenimore, Quinton Greene,
and Kevin Blythe Sampson 
pack the exhibition with raw emotion and visual intrigue.
 
Hoffman, born in
Philadelphia,moved to Abseconwhere heoperated a junkyard with his uncle.Entirelyself-
taught, Hoffman carved wooden reliefs and free standing sculptures of American life.
It was common to seeHoffman on theboardwalk in Atlantic City with an audience gathered around him
admiring the dramatic scale and forth right clarity of his carved images.
 
Janice Fenimore, of Madison, New Jersey, taught herself how to use woodworking tools after
she raised her two children.
She began by working with traditional designs from early America
n crafters, making wood carvings
and then painting them. Her interest in whirligigs inspired her to bring her work into the third-dimension.
Fenimore’s pieces are found in the permanent collections of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, Newark Museum, and The Smithsonian Institution/Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C.
 
Kevin Sampson, born in Elizabeth, NJ, grew up in a household devoted to civil rights and community concerns.
For years, Sampson served as a police sketch artist and took early
retirement after the death of his infant son and his wife. He utilized art as not only a release, but as a different way of providing service to his community. The creation of these sculptures are quite unique, involving molding, cementing, painting over, sometimes
concealing, or never revealing the items used such as animal bones, chili peppers, hair, jewelry, tile, wax and pieces of wood.
 
This exhibition challenges and surprises the viewer at every turn. The unique works prove why self-taught art is now a global phenomenon.
These passionate artists create powerful works that can stand alongside the best of
modern and contemporary art.

4/15/14

Utopian Vision Born of a Harsh Truth New York Times

Photo
From left to right: “The Marked Man” (2011, printed 2014), Jayson Keeling, photographed by Andy Brown; “Face Morph #134” (2009-13), by Janet Henry;  “New York Quotidian Series” (2012), by Carl E. Hazlewood. Credit Left to right: Courtesy of Jayson Keeling and Andy Brown; Janet Henry; Carl E. Hazlewood
Continue reading the main story Share This Page
The exhibition “Aljira at 30: Dream and Reality,” at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton, starts with a video revisiting the 1967 Newark riots, titled “5 Days in July,” by Chuck Schultz and Esther Podemski. Made in 2007, it was shown that year at Aljira, an alternative exhibition space in Newark for emerging and underrepresented artists. The two-screen piece shows the city on fire and footage of the National Guard overrunning the rebellion of the African-American community after the arrest and beating of a cabdriver for a traffic infraction.
For Victor Davson, a Guyanese immigrant who in 1983 found cheap, expansive studio space for himself and a group of students, and a community still deeply scarred by these events, the riots were pivotal to the birth of Aljira. “There was this connection between a sense of decay and abandonment in the neighborhood and seeing an opportunity to somehow try to use it positively,” Mr. Davson said in a telephone interview. 
When a friend of Mr. Davson’s who had also emigrated from Guyana, Carl E. Hazlewood, visited the studio the next year, the two young artists envisioned starting a gallery there that would offer possibilities to artists of various racial and cultural backgrounds who were not often finding places to show their work. They named their utopian art space Aljira, the Aboriginal word for “dream time.”
Photo
“Now Is the Time” (2009), by Willie Cole. Credit Willie Cole
“We didn’t have a big mission at the time,” said Mr. Hazlewood, who focused on the curatorial side as artistic director while Mr. Davson raised money as executive director. “We were just expressing our own multicultural perspectives and what we wanted the world to look like.
“Our first criteria was that the art be good, and all the other things came along with it: to show female artists who were good, to show black artists who were good, to show Latinos. We wanted to reflect our environment, to develop something that was interesting to Newark especially, but also to reflect the world at large.”
“Aljira at 30: Dream and Reality,” on view through Sept. 28, traces how this grass-roots organization has grown into a vibrant center for both local and nationally known artists and provides diverse cultural and educational services in its underserved community.
“We want people to know what Aljira is and why it’s important,” said Margaret M. O’Reilly, curator of fine art at the State Museum. She said she had been consistently exposed to new artists through Aljira exhibitions and had bought art from its yearly fund-raising auction for her institution’s collection. Ms. O’Reilly organized the exhibition with Mr. Hazlewood and two other artists, Jaret Vadera and Cicely Cottingham. It includes ephemera telling the story of the organization’s evolution decade by decade, and artworks by 41 of the roughly 1,800 artists affiliated with Aljira over the years.
Photo
“Sweet Dreams” (2010), by Philemona Williamson Credit Courtesy of the artist and the June Kelly Gallery
A wall of archival photographs, fliers and invitations from the 1980s shows how Aljira found its footing. In 1984, while the founders were cleaning floors and painting walls to create an acceptable gallery space, they engaged the neighborhood children in a project painting a mural across the exterior of the building. From there, exhibitions included the inaugural show that year of Rafael Sanchez, a Cuban-born artist and one of the original students working in the building, and the 1989 show “Promise of Progress,” organized by Fred Wilson and including Mel Chin and Willie Cole, who are all prominent in the art world today.
Installed near the archival wall are mixed-media works by Mr. Cole, who lived in Newark and was little known before his ongoing association with Aljira, and by the seminal players in the gallery, including Mr. Davson, Mr. Hazlewood, Ms. Cottingham and Elizabeth Seaton. Almost all of the artworks in the show are contemporary, to emphasize how the opportunities afforded by Aljira have helped these artists continue to practice actively today.
A section devoted to the 1990s, when Aljira moved to a space downtown on Washington Place, underscores how far it had come as a nationally and internationally recognized contemporary art center in just a decade. In 1994, an Aljira project was selected to represent the United States at the IV Bienal Internacional de Pintura in Ecuador with works by artists including Donald Locke, also born in Guyana, and Philemona Williamson, of Montclair. Both have recent works in the Trenton show.
In 2002, with the help of a major grant from the Newark-based Prudential Foundation, Aljira relocated to its current street-level space at 591 Broad Street in the city’s cultural district. On view in the section devoted to the 2000s is work such as “Obama in the White Man’s Land,” a 2009 sculpture of a nightmarish landscape in carnival colors by a local self-taught artist, Kevin Sampson, and a 2013 four-panel piece of African-American women’s hairstyles “painted” in shimmering black rhinestones by Mickalene Thomas.
Over the past decade, Aljira has expanded its range of educational and professional development programs, which are highlighted in posters and reproductions papering a reading room installed within the exhibition. Culture Creators, for instance, is a program co-sponsored by Rutgers University for Newark teenagers who have limited access to the arts; they visit museums, meet artists around the region and participate in art-making workshops. “Bending the Grid” is a series of exhibitions devoted to artists over 65. The first of these retrospectives, in 2003, focused on Frank Bowling, a classmate of David Hockney’s at the Royal Academy of Arts in London who never received the recognition commensurate with his decades of work (he was voted the first black Royal Academician by his peers after the Aljira exhibition).
For artists just starting their careers, the Emerge program offers practical tools not taught in art school, such as finding gallery representation and managing financial issues. Artists who have participated in the program and now have national profiles include Leslie Hewitt, Jeffrey Gibson and Shinique Smith. “In my generation,” Mr. Hazlewood said, “you did the work and eventually hoped one day someone would respond to it. But now, when there are so many artists, you need to strategize. I’m glad that we’re able to pass this on to a younger generation of artists.”
Correction: April 13, 2014
An earlier version of this article misspelled the surname of an artist who was involved in Aljira’s beginnings. She is Elizabeth Seaton, not Seton.

4/9/14

PraiseSongs for the Numinous at Cavin-Morris Gallery

PraiseSongs for the Numinous at Cavin-Morris Gallery

The exhibition of new sculpture at Cavin-Morris Gallery shows a sense of curatorial care which imbues the space with the feeling of a dining room methodically organized for a dinner party, where the attention is paid not only to the detail of the space, but to the preferences and tastes of the soon to be arriving guests:
“In the case of this exhibition, PraiseSongs for the Numinous, and these artists presented we had to, as curators, build a familiarity with the artist, the work, and its context in the artists’ world to know just where that intentionality was. There are common threads here, but possibly the most common one is that of animism, the belief in spirit contained in organic and inorganic objects.”
Guillaume Couffignal Théâtre, 2014 Bronze 41.5 x 32 x 25.5 inches 105.4 x 81.3 x 64.8 cm
Guillaume Couffignal
Théâtre, 2014
Bronze
41.5 x 32 x 25.5 inches
105.4 x 81.3 x 64.8 cm
The cohesivity of the show gives rise to this collective animism which pervades the space like a unified voice, a voice both old and recognizable yet palpably new and invigorating. What might pass as a collection of anthropological finds en route to a museum of history, the sculptures collected here carry a weight of the past with them despite being so recently crafted. The dynamic animism which the curators so rightly saw in the artists they brought together is an animism of mythical spirit, an energy of old which makes the works feel like sacred relics that were uncovered rather than produced. For some of the artists, this feeling of discovery opposed to production for the purpose of sale is intrinsic to the pieces; Gregory Van Maanen’s amulets were not made for sale but as gifts to family and friends as objects of healing: “they are extensions of his intimate observations of Nature and its occult unpredictabilities.” Kevin Sampson’s works, too, are meant to be amulets; they’re the “spirit yards of the south in miniature,” tiny representations of a larger, sweeping feeling meant to preserve and pay homage to communal memory.
Gregory Van Maanen Untitled, 2014 Acrylic and ink on stone 2.75 x 2 x .25 inches 7 x 5.1 x .6 cm GVM 2344
Gregory Van Maanen
Untitled, 2014
Acrylic and ink on stone
2.75 x 2 x .25 inches
7 x 5.1 x .6 cm
GVM 2344
The curators call Mark Perez’ work “messengers,” as if their existence isn’t the ‘art’ or finished products themselves, but simply a means of conveying a larger experiential message to whomever happens to stumble across them. It’s for this reason, this sense of conveyance opposed to the explicit itinerary of selling, which makes the exhibition feel both unassuming and inviting. Ghyslaine and Sylvain Staelens’ sculptures reign over a “mystical landscape,” being more about “the voices in the woods: gypsies, pagans, witches,” than they are about the contemporary environment in which they’re situated. In this sense, all of the artists embody this sense of space/time displacement, or a place of “timelessness” which the curators themselves admit to trying to bring about in the exhibition. They say “we wanted to show work that moved backwards as well as forward temporally.” The show certainly succeeds, and the movement (the animas, spirit, and animism) makes it worthwhile to spend the time in the gallery’s space, which may or may not feel like a time in the present.
Sylvain and Ghyslaine Staelens Le Chamane, 2013 Wood, metal, cloth, found objects 68 x 37 x 25 inches 172.7 x 94 x 63.5 cm
Sylvain and Ghyslaine Staelens
Le Chamane, 2013
Wood, metal, cloth, found objects
68 x 37 x 25 inches
172.7 x 94 x 63.5 cm
Marc Perez Yak bâté , 2012 Mixed media 13.25 x 11.25 x 5.5 inches 33.7 x 28.6 x 14 cm
Marc Perez
Yak bâté , 2012
Mixed media
13.25 x 11.25 x 5.5 inches
33.7 x 28.6 x 14 cm
New sculpture by Jane Wheeler, Phyllis Sullivan, Tim Rowan, Melanie Ferguson, Monique Rutherford, Sarah Purvey, Kevin Sampson, Gregory Van Maanen, Guillaume Couffignal, Sylvain Corentin, Marc Perez, Sandra Sheehy, and Ghyslaine and Sylvain Staelens are on view now at PraiseSongs for the Numinous at Cavin-Morris Gallery at 210 Eleventh Ave., Suite 210. The show continues through April 26, 2014.
- Amie Zimmer
All photos courtesy of Cavin-Morris Gallery

3/27/14

Kevin Blythe Sampson Gallery 1978 presents: Art, Newark Past, Present, Future, A panel discussion



Gallery 1978 presents: Art, Newark Past, Present, Future,
A panel discussion
April 6, 3-5 PM  2014
Join Gallery 1978 as we explore Newark's illustrious art: past, diverse present and exciting future. The forum will provide an opportunity for members of the creative community to gain an insight into the recent history of the Newark Art Movement; how it has evolved, its current state and plans for the future.
Members of our distinguished panel will include:
·      Steven Kern, recently named Director & CEO of the Newark Museum, former executive director of the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse.
·      Gladys Grauer has been called the mother of Newark artists. Over the last fifty years she has been a vital part of the development of the Newark art community.
·      Barbara Kukla, author, journalist, Newark historian, and award-winning former, Star-Ledger Editor
·      Evonne M. Davis, photographer, Artistic Director Gallery Aferro, Newark,
·      Kevin Sampson, artist, teacher, retired police officer, and community organizer gallery artist with Cavin-Morris Gallery, NY, Senzala Fine Art Studio, NJ. In the permanent collections of: the Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, the American Folk Art Museum and at the Delaware Art Museum. 
Moderated by Kevin Darmanie, artist, printmaker, and muralist.
A Reception with refreshments from 5:00-5:30 PM
Gallery 1978 is a division of the Township of Maplewood Department of Recreation and Cultural Affairs, located at 1978 Springfield Ave, at the corner of Broadview in Maplewood
Website 1978artscenter.org Contact us 1978artscenter@gmail.com

3/26/14

Kevin Blythe Sampson at The Noyes Museum of Art of Stockton College



 Kevin Blythe Sampson is part of a group show at the:

The Noyes Museum of Art
of Stockton College

May 16 - September 21, 2014
Detour: Self Taught Artists
Painting, drawing, and sculpture by American self–taught artists of the Mid-Atlantic region. Out of the ordinary works made in aesthetic isolation with the drive of the human spirit to create.

http://www.noyesmuseum.org/upcoming_exhibits.html

 The Noyes Museum of Art
of Stockton College
733 Lily Lake Road
Oceanville (Galloway TWP.), NJ, 08231
(609) 652-8848

1/14/14

Kevin Blythe Sampson's Installation "An Ill wind A Blowing" currently on display in the Exhibition “All That Glitters”


 Photos of Kevin Blythe Sampson's
 Installation "An Ill wind A Blowing" currently on display in the Exhibition

“All That Glitters”  

Thursday, January 16th    – Thursday, March 20th

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 16th 6 pm – 9 pm


About The Gateway Project:
Located in the heart of Newark
ʼ

Gateway Project is a series of pop up art exhibitions adjacent to Newark Pennsylvania Station
 
 
About The Gateway Project:
Located in the heart of Newark
ʼ
s Gateway Center, crossroad of
over 30,000 people daily, the
Gateway Project is a series of pop up art exhibitions adjacent to Newark Pennsylvania Station,
The series is made possible by art organizations Solo(s) Project House in Newark, New Jersey.
Gateway II owner, C&K Properties is sponsoring and hosting the events
 

 Exhibiting Artists: Willie Cole, Ryan Trecartin, Katherine Bernhardt, Shoplifter, Akintola Hanif, Shoshanna Weinberger, Raul de Nieves,
 Kevin  Blythe Sampson, Richard Wislocky, Alexandria Despris, Mary Edna Fraser, Ayana Evans, Angelina Dreem, Andrew Baron, Ashli Sisk, Brendan Mahoney, Benjamin Phelan, Eric Barry Drasin, Fernando Montiel Klint, Hannah Craft, Katya Grokhovsky, Jessica Bowman, Melvin Jones, Labanna Babalon, Luca Cusolito, Sid Art and Whitney Lea Sage.


 Photos By  Elzbieta Kaciuba
Elzbieta Kaciuba Photography.LLC
 




















1/5/14

ALL THAT GLITTERS

ALL THAT GLITTERS

Curated by Athena Barat
& Rebecca Jampol
Thursday, January 16th  –
Thursday, March 20th
Opening Reception:
Thursday, January 16th
6 pm – 9 pm
Exhibiting Artists: Willie Cole, Katherine Bernhardt, Shoplifter, Akintola Hanif, Shoshanna Weinberger, Raul de Nieves, Kevin Sampson, Richard Wislocky, Alexandria Despris, Mary Edna Fraser, Ayana Evans, Angelina Dreem, Andrew Barron, Ashli Sisk, Brendan Mohaney, Benjamin Phelan, Eric Drasin, Fernando Montiel Klint, Hannah Craft, Katya Grokhovsky, Jessica Bowman, Melvin Jones, Labanna Babalon, Luca Cusolito, Sid Art and Whitney Lea Sage.
Performances Opening Night by:
Colin Self and Chez Deep
Katya Grokhovsky
& Ayana Evans

“All that Glitters”, a group exhibition about abundance, luxury and decadence, flirtations with vulgarity, and the ache for exaltation.
About Guest Curator, Athena Barat:
Through her role as creative director of the Barat Foundation artist, curator and educator, Athena Barat, has reinvigorated public art in Newark New Jersey by producing the largest collaborative projects and events in the city’s history. Her projects bring a special blend of celebration, high art and craft; are often interactive and ask viewers to exercise their freedom. Ms. Barat has participated in residencies in France, Iceland, Belgium and Holland; is part of the international fashion collaborative Andrea Crews, writes music and performs, and is this year’s Garden State Woman of the Year in recognition of her work with Newark’s youth.
About The Gateway Project:
Located in the heart of Newark’s Gateway Center, crossroad of over 30,000 people daily, the Gateway Project is a series of pop up art exhibitions adjacent to Newark Pennsylvania Station.
The series is made possible by art organizations Solo(s) Project House in Newark, New Jersey. Gateway II owner, C&K Properties is sponsoring and hosting the events.
 Above image:
“May U Alwayz Align Urself w/ Abundance”
by Jessica Bowman