The art of Kevin Blythe Sampson

THE ART OF
KEVIN BLYTHE SAMPSON

8/19/11

How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire

How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire

Entertainment

How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire


How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire
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Steve Harvey speaks onstage at the 2nd annual Steve Harvey Foundation Gala at Cipriani, Wall Street on April 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for The Steve Harvey Foundation)

Although many of her accusations, such as her claim that Harvey turned their son against her and Harvey left her penniless, were successfully challenged as untrue, her allegations of Harvey's numerous infidelities were not. The only loud objection came from Harvey's current wife, Marjorie, when Mary accused her of being Harvey's mistress before Mary's divorce from him in 2005.

Instead of turning away from that philandering past, Harvey claims to use his background for good, hipping clueless black women in particular against the games black men play. That's the perspective he's claimed during his radio show's popular segment, Strawberry Letter, where readers send Harvey's sidekick Shirley Strawberry a letter usually of relationship distress.

Given the cyber sideyes black women have given and continue to give Alicia Keys and Fantasia in their respective relationships with men who were not legally unattached at the initiation of them, it's curious that Harvey gets a pass. In many ways, he's become the "Teflon Harvey," where nothing sticks.

Essence.com blogger S. Tia Brown even came to his defense with her post "Sound-Off: A Case for Steve Harvey". "I'm so tired of I'm so tired of hearing black people -- especially the men -- hate on Steve Harvey," she began that post.

What some people call "hate," others call legitimate concern and rightful criticism. Regardless of which side of the Steve Harvey fence you stand, one thing is undeniable: the man has worked hard.

From stand-up comic to a longtime hosting gig for It's Showtime at the Apollo, where he mingled his sitcoms into his load, and then on to radio while being on the road with The Kings of Comedy, which became, arguably, his most successful film, and juggling his sitcom The Steve Harvey Show. Harvey clearly hasn't wasted any opportunity that has come his way.

Who knows how he will fare in daytime television with his own comedic take on love and relationships? If he fails, he will be in great company. Conquering daytime is so hard. That's why Oprah is consistently held for her unprecedented staying power.

Also, with his recent criticism of Cornel West and Tavis Smiley, where he has since apologized for (he calling them "Uncle Toms"), he has demonstrated a willingness to get dangerously controversial. Only time will tell if he's the best man for the job.

For now, Harvey continues to surprise. With Oprah already at her own network and Perry's formal announcement that he's not far behind, maybe Harvey will be the latest to join the real "BET -- Black Entertainment Television" movement. After all, you can't knock the hustle if it keeps paying these dividends.


Entertainment

How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire


How Steve Harvey has grown his media empire
Join Our Mailing List
EMAIL
Related News
Watch Tyler Perry lunge into action in clip from 'I, Alex Cross'
Judge asked to reconsider 'The Help' lawsuit
The week in pop culture: 'Winnie' is on its way in, Meeka is her way out
1
Love it
0
Inspiring
0
So Sad
0
ROTFL
0
SMH

Steve Harvey speaks onstage at the 2nd annual Steve Harvey Foundation Gala at Cipriani, Wall Street on April 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for The Steve Harvey Foundation)

Although many of her accusations, such as her claim that Harvey turned their son against her and Harvey left her penniless, were successfully challenged as untrue, her allegations of Harvey's numerous infidelities were not. The only loud objection came from Harvey's current wife, Marjorie, when Mary accused her of being Harvey's mistress before Mary's divorce from him in 2005.

Instead of turning away from that philandering past, Harvey claims to use his background for good, hipping clueless black women in particular against the games black men play. That's the perspective he's claimed during his radio show's popular segment, Strawberry Letter, where readers send Harvey's sidekick Shirley Strawberry a letter usually of relationship distress.

Given the cyber sideyes black women have given and continue to give Alicia Keys and Fantasia in their respective relationships with men who were not legally unattached at the initiation of them, it's curious that Harvey gets a pass. In many ways, he's become the "Teflon Harvey," where nothing sticks.

Essence.com blogger S. Tia Brown even came to his defense with her post "Sound-Off: A Case for Steve Harvey". "I'm so tired of I'm so tired of hearing black people -- especially the men -- hate on Steve Harvey," she began that post.

What some people call "hate," others call legitimate concern and rightful criticism. Regardless of which side of the Steve Harvey fence you stand, one thing is undeniable: the man has worked hard.

From stand-up comic to a longtime hosting gig for It's Showtime at the Apollo, where he mingled his sitcoms into his load, and then on to radio while being on the road with The Kings of Comedy, which became, arguably, his most successful film, and juggling his sitcom The Steve Harvey Show. Harvey clearly hasn't wasted any opportunity that has come his way.

Who knows how he will fare in daytime television with his own comedic take on love and relationships? If he fails, he will be in great company. Conquering daytime is so hard. That's why Oprah is consistently held for her unprecedented staying power.

Also, with his recent criticism of Cornel West and Tavis Smiley, where he has since apologized for (he calling them "Uncle Toms"), he has demonstrated a willingness to get dangerously controversial. Only time will tell if he's the best man for the job.

For now, Harvey continues to surprise. With Oprah already at her own network and Perry's formal announcement that he's not far behind, maybe Harvey will be the latest to join the real "BET -- Black Entertainment Television" movement. After all, you can't knock the hustle if it keeps paying these dividends.